A CLASSIC STEP IN TO THE FUTURE

Founded in 1878, Lozza is the oldest eyewear brand in Italy. Among the pages of its history, we find a constant focus on the future and on innovation. This history endows the brand with an innate superiority, making it the emblem - still today - of the ultimate cult spectacle. Its traditional classicism and refinement, blended with a highly evocative vintage inspiration, gives rise to articles with contemporary flavour. In a world where appearance is becoming increasingly void of meaning, Lozza is one of the few brands to offer an aesthetic that is rich in content, in response to the most contemporary of needs.
140 YEARS OF HISTORY

Lozza is not just a great example of personal, family and corporate success; it is also the promoter of one of the most interesting Italian industrial phenomena. Back in 1878, a small group of people founded a small workshop - and the early seed of an entire eyewear empire - equipped with technology, tenacity and ingenuity, thus avoiding the emigration with which most of the population of Cadore was faced. Giovanni Lozza and two travelling eyewear salesmen set up an eyewear factory and slowly convinced their friends and relatives to open optical shops in various cities within the Veneto region.

The company was short lived, and Giovanni Lozza continued his business venture alone, building machinery for glasses sold by third parties. In June 1912, he officially opened the Lozza mechanical workshop. Between the two wars, the company opened a branch in Salo and two warehouses in Rome and Milan. Lozza has been rewarded with international prizes and honours of merit for all of its hard work, as an example of successful entrepreneurship worldwide.

The Forties
With the end of the Second World War (1946), Lozza promoted a series of special models, and most notably Zilo, Lozza's glasses par excellence, which had first been designed in 1930. With Zilo, the combination of plastic and metal enjoyed unparalleled success, selling millions and winning a CFDA Fashion Award, or Oscar of Fashion, in the sixties.
The Fifties
A new "youth culture" was beginning to emerge with its own behaviours, tastes, styles and languages. Elvis Presley and James Dean were the main role models for this emerging category of consumers. The increasing use of plastic (celluloid, bakelite, galaite) meant that eyewear could become a "consolidated" accessory. At that time, Lozza created glasses in a variety of shapes, ranging from striking frames to ultra feminine elongated models, featuring embossed end pieces fitted with special inserts such as rhinestones and the mother of pearl.
The Sixties
The watchword at this time was "freedom". Conformist fogies were overwhelmed by a wave of vitality, imagination and creativity from overseas. Men went into space and were soon to set foot on the moon. These were the years of John Lennon's round glasses in the US and Marcel Rochas' "flower glasses" in Paris. At that time, Lozza designed glasses with geometric front pieces and lightly rounded edges in the shape of trapezoids and rhombuses.
The Seventies
Lozza has always been equated with style and meticulous commitment to technological research, as well as a productive blend of craftsmanship and the use of innovative materials. Zilo - ever the brand's flagship model - made a great splash, and Lozza became a must-have brand synonymous with fashion. Eyewear took on cultural and spiritual values, turning into a political and religious canon: tell me which glasses you wear and I'll tell you who you are.
The Eighties
In 1983, Lozza was acquired lock, stock and barrel, with all of its technological know-how in all of its collections, by the De Rigo Group based in Longarone - one of the main heirs of the Cadore eyewear tradition. With Lozza, Ennio De Rigo acquired a somewhat complex professional and moral legacy, taking on the responsibility of ensuring the continuity and evolution of a well-known, high-quality product. Ennio certainly lived up to the task; Lozza's success continued unperturbed; so much so that leading names in ready-to-wear fashion would turn to Lozza for their collections.
The Nineties
The nineties were the years of understatement and of the rejection of a slavish attention to fashion. Metal took over from plastic, due to its lightness and robustness and for its ability to create slender, almost non-existent frames. At this time, Lozza produced a wide range of minimal, linear styles. Whilst the predominance of metal over plastic marked a turnaround in the history of the brand, its quality workmanship, precision and attention to detail remained untouched, reflecting Lozza's customary respect for tradition.
The Noughties
The new century saw a return of the desire for security, to the nostalgia for time-honoured craftsmanship and a sound knowledge based on tradition. In the last century, Lozza produced many iconic eyewear models, such as Zilo, reproduced to this day in optical and sunglass versions, and Cooper, revisited in trendy colours. Although classic and elegant, in the new millennium, Lozza eyewear became vintage-inspired; ever new but with a strong evocative power. A familiar spirit accompanied the brand's production, ever-attentive to content whilst meeting the most contemporary of needs. Lozza was often the eyewear of choice of showbiz celebs, both on stage and in behind the scenes. The brand's image thus enjoyed the spontaneous endorsement of actors and singers, who offered themselves as prestigious testimonials.
The decade from 2000 to 2010
These years witnessed an increasing focus on the pursuit of original, unique products; knowing you owned a customised piece of eyewear that suited your face perfectly in terms of size, shape, material and colour, made this concept extremely desirable. To meet this growing demand, Lozza decided to provide its customers with the chance to experience an exclusive form of personalisation, inspired precisely by their very own ideas and creativity. In 2010 Lozza developed Lozza Sartoriale, an exclusive project born from a desire to create unique, elegant products capable of upholding the key values of the brand: Italian style, craftsmanship, attention to detail and innovation. The result was tailor-made eyewear that was entirely made-to-measure through a clever blend of craftsmanship and digital technology, influenced by the expertise and experience of opticians, who thus became true ‘tailors’ of their trade.
Today
The brand has introduced a new iconic logo. The recurrent use of lines in its historical archives has led Lozza to develop a frieze (PAT.2728162) consisting of five horizontal lines that recall the five letters that make up the brand's name. As a tribute to its heritage, Lozza has extended this frieze to all sunglasses and optical frames, representing the brand unequivocally. The only exceptions are the brand's iconic Cooper, Macho and Zilo models, which preserve their historical logos.
The Forties
With the end of the Second World War (1946), Lozza promoted a series of special models, and most notably Zilo, Lozza's glasses par excellence, which had first been designed in 1930. With Zilo, the combination of plastic and metal enjoyed unparalleled success, selling millions and winning a CFDA Fashion Award, or Oscar of Fashion, in the sixties.
The Fifties
A new "youth culture" was beginning to emerge with its own behaviours, tastes, styles and languages. Elvis Presley and James Dean were the main role models for this emerging category of consumers. The increasing use of plastic (celluloid, bakelite, galaite) meant that eyewear could become a "consolidated" accessory. At that time, Lozza created glasses in a variety of shapes, ranging from striking frames to ultra feminine elongated models, featuring embossed end pieces fitted with special inserts such as rhinestones and the mother of pearl.
The Sixties
The watchword at this time was "freedom". Conformist fogies were overwhelmed by a wave of vitality, imagination and creativity from overseas. Men went into space and were soon to set foot on the moon. These were the years of John Lennon's round glasses in the US and Marcel Rochas' "flower glasses" in Paris. At that time, Lozza designed glasses with geometric front pieces and lightly rounded edges in the shape of trapezoids and rhombuses.
The Seventies
Lozza has always been equated with style and meticulous commitment to technological research, as well as a productive blend of craftsmanship and the use of innovative materials. Zilo - ever the brand's flagship model - made a great splash, and Lozza became a must-have brand synonymous with fashion. Eyewear took on cultural and spiritual values, turning into a political and religious canon: tell me which glasses you wear and I'll tell you who you are.
The Eighties
In 1983, Lozza was acquired lock, stock and barrel, with all of its technological know-how in all of its collections, by the De Rigo Group based in Longarone - one of the main heirs of the Cadore eyewear tradition. With Lozza, Ennio De Rigo acquired a somewhat complex professional and moral legacy, taking on the responsibility of ensuring the continuity and evolution of a well-known, high-quality product. Ennio certainly lived up to the task; Lozza's success continued unperturbed; so much so that leading names in ready-to-wear fashion would turn to Lozza for their collections.
The Nineties
The nineties were the years of understatement and of the rejection of a slavish attention to fashion. Metal took over from plastic, due to its lightness and robustness and for its ability to create slender, almost non-existent frames. At this time, Lozza produced a wide range of minimal, linear styles. Whilst the predominance of metal over plastic marked a turnaround in the history of the brand, its quality workmanship, precision and attention to detail remained untouched, reflecting Lozza's customary respect for tradition.
The Noughties
The new century saw a return of the desire for security, to the nostalgia for time-honoured craftsmanship and a sound knowledge based on tradition. In the last century, Lozza produced many iconic eyewear models, such as Zilo, reproduced to this day in optical and sunglass versions, and Cooper, revisited in trendy colours. Although classic and elegant, in the new millennium, Lozza eyewear became vintage-inspired; ever new but with a strong evocative power. A familiar spirit accompanied the brand's production, ever-attentive to content whilst meeting the most contemporary of needs. Lozza was often the eyewear of choice of showbiz celebs, both on stage and in behind the scenes. The brand's image thus enjoyed the spontaneous endorsement of actors and singers, who offered themselves as prestigious testimonials.
The decade from 2000 to 2010
These years witnessed an increasing focus on the pursuit of original, unique products; knowing you owned a customised piece of eyewear that suited your face perfectly in terms of size, shape, material and colour, made this concept extremely desirable. To meet this growing demand, Lozza decided to provide its customers with the chance to experience an exclusive form of personalisation, inspired precisely by their very own ideas and creativity. In 2010 Lozza developed Lozza Sartoriale, an exclusive project born from a desire to create unique, elegant products capable of upholding the key values of the brand: Italian style, craftsmanship, attention to detail and innovation. The result was tailor-made eyewear that was entirely made-to-measure through a clever blend of craftsmanship and digital technology, influenced by the expertise and experience of opticians, who thus became true ‘tailors’ of their trade.
Today
The brand has introduced a new iconic logo. The recurrent use of lines in its historical archives has led Lozza to develop a frieze (PAT.2728162) consisting of five horizontal lines that recall the five letters that make up the brand's name. As a tribute to its heritage, Lozza has extended this frieze to all sunglasses and optical frames, representing the brand unequivocally. The only exceptions are the brand's iconic Cooper, Macho and Zilo models, which preserve their historical logos.
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